ESPORTS4INDIE

Tiffany Lillie

Tiffany Lillie

With her English degree from the University of Toronto* hanging on the wall, Tiffany is ready and willing to help sentences in need. (Sometimes all she can do is make them comfortable before they're deleted.) Her hobbies include trying to survive in Don't Starve: Together and designing 3D houses in Blender to upload to the virtual world of Second Life. Originally from Canada, Tiffany says "about" strangely sometimes (but it sounds nothing like "aboot") and thinks Seattle is a vast improvement in weather conditions compared to Toronto.

*She graduated with an Honours Bachelor of Arts, majoring in English and minoring in Philosophy and Writing & Rhetoric. She believes thinking helps writing and vice versa.

Haimrik is an out-there mixture of puzzler and platformer that succeeds in heart, yet falls short of being intelligent — much like the main character.

This house-renovating simulator provides a satisfying sense of progression and realism. Its focus veers away from architectural and interior design, letting handiwork steal the spotlight.

The title offers a difficult and tedious challenge for those looking for one. Unfortunately, it isn’t founded on enough complexity to hold your interest for the long term. Lost In The Dungeon has shown its hand, and unfortunately, it doesn’t contain many strategy, polish, or uniqueness cards.

Despite the numerous problems that need to be addressed, Carried Away doesn't have the kind of bugs that make it unplayable. It has a solid foundation, promising to become a truly enjoyable building simulator with improvements. An example from gameplay makes a good metaphor for what you can expect: You can complete a level even if your skier dies because his corpse can skid across the finish line. This is either a morbidly humorous definition of passing a level, or a bug. The fact that you can't tell doesn't hinder you from laughing out loud.

This slow-paced, emotionally-impactful adventure that is effectively a treasure hunt is suited to gamers who would enjoy being along for the ride in the healing process after a traumatic event. Sentimentality and patience are advised, as you won't find any exploding helicopters here; merely a quirky, imperfect meandering through the struggles that go along with loneliness that will be largely successful in making you feel satisfyingly sad.

This light-hearted visual novel is the equivalent of indulging in a giant piece of chocolate cake. You know it's not what your doctor would recommend; it's mostly empty calories. But nevertheless, it looks amazing, the rush from the sugar is pleasing, and you enjoy every single bite.

Steamburg needs more polishing to be player-friendly, being too buggy and clumsy in its current state. But even if these problems were addressed, Steamburg would merely be a predictable puzzle adventure with lacklustre visuals, a stereotypical storyline, and uninspired puzzles.

Educating the public about mental illness is important, but a problem inherent in accurately portraying depression is that, well, it isn't fun to be depressed. Indygo skillfully builds a gloomy atmosphere: The voice acting, music, black and white art style, and narrative all work together to convey the disconnection and emptiness a person suffering from depression can feel. You may come away with a better understanding of depression by playing, but if you're looking for entertainment along with your education, you will be disappointed.

Ayo shares with its audience a sincere message encapsulated by game, and continues the progression we have seen recently of video games used as a vehicle beyond the immediate capacity for ‘interactive entertainment.’ Despite a clunky camera and some problematic puzzles, this platformer boats a solid foundation, with promise of several hours of enlightening fun.

Müll’s puzzles detract from the experience of a graphic story focused on a narrative, for an experience tilting toward anxiety and depression. It’s unfortunate. A compelling plot, a character arc, and a clear message could go a long way, coupled with the drawings of the talented game creator, Ozzie Sneddon.

Last Day of June is unique and story-driven, suited for those who appreciate a slower-paced journey. The reward is an artful experience that stands a chance of resonating with your heart.

If you loved the first Cook, Serve, Delicious!, then you'll probably love Cook 2, as well. While there are major bugs for the Mac version right now, there are only minor bugs for Windows. I feel like using a mouse and keyboard will always feel somewhat constraining, however, although improvements to the gameplay could alleviate that feeling somewhat. As Cook 2 stands now, it is compelling, with plenty to enjoy in it, although ultimately the dish feels a bit stale.