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John Gerritzen

John Gerritzen

John Gerritzen is a programmer by education, author by hobby, and game critic by occupation. While he usually favors RPGs, he will play anything that engages him narratively or mechanically. When he's not playing games for fun or profit, he's usually reading or watching anime.

As far as Early Access goes, HellSign has a lot to offer. Clocking in at around twelve hours of content, it has an interesting core gameplay loop that is satisfying to replay.

Underworld Ascendant is surprisingly unpolished and actively difficult to play. Without patches addressing the myriad bugs present in the current product, this one is a hard pass.

While it can be frustrating navigating bunkers and other hazards while you hone your skills, The Golf Club featuring PGA Tour 2019 provides a solid, enjoyable golfing experience.

While it delivers a strong start, Call of Cthulhu starts to stumble and fall near the end, demonstrating a lack of polish and poor localization.

Good graphics can’t redeem some of the poorer design choices in SINNER: Sacrifice for Redemption. A very, very rough take on the Soulsborne formula, SINNER is really only for diehard fans that are truly desperate for something new to cut their teeth on.

A tightly designed, fast-paced, top-down roguelite, Synthetik will no doubt entertain for hours. With the release of the new Legion Rising free update, there’s even more to enjoy.

A fantastic way to break an eight-year hiatus, Mega Man 11 is the return that fans of the Blue Bomber have been waiting for.

CrossCode is a decidedly fantastic revival of the old-school action RPG à la Secret of Mana of old, with a high degree of polish and a great story.

Fatally flawed with bugs, soft locks, and incomplete map generation, Deep Sky Derelicts is a fun game when it works. More often than not, however, it doesn’t work.

An interesting take on the isometric ARPG, Shadows: Awakening provides a short romp through the main campaign with three different endings providing some limited replayability.

Two parts XCOM and one part Invisible, Inc., Phantom Doctrine is a fun take on the turn-based tactical genre that struggles with silly pathfinding and an uncertain storyline.

With a few quality-of-life improvements, Two Point Hospital would be a fantastic entry-- as it stands, it’s still a charming and hilarious buy for fans of the management genre.

Headsnatchers is a great time when played with a group of friends. I would have mentioned the music had I been able to hear it over our laughing, taunting, and carrying on. However, with less than that, it can be a little underwhelming. It's a worthwhile purchase if you're looking for an alternative to a board game night or party entertainment for a small group and are willing to support a title still in development.

While City of the Shroud, a real-time strategy RPG, has some interesting design ideas in theory, in practice these designs fall flat.

Darkest Dungeon: The Color of Madness is a fine addition to an already great game that adds perpetual, challenging content fit for veterans.

Free from bugs, but otherwise not having much to recommend it, Insane Robots suffers from a series of poor design decisions that wind up making it exceedingly average.

Cefore is an early access, physics-based puzzler with great potential and a comprehensive level editor to round out the experience after the completion of the main campaign. Fans of the genre should give this title at least a passing glance.