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Three For MOTHERGUNSHIP: OPN Dev Talk with Grip Digital

Editor's Note: with our latest Dev Talk series, Three For, developers make a case for their upcoming release, gaming history and industry trends considered. Acknowledging the busy market that has become the indie scene and today's abundance in options, our questions invite developers to make a case as to why their labor of love is worth what's in your wallet.

This interview has been edited and condensed.

1. Introduce us to Grip Digital. Who are you guys?

Grip Digital is a video game developer and publisher based in Prague, Czech Republic. We've been in the industry for nearly a decade and during this period we have worked on over 50 projects on all major platforms, from one-man games, to multinational AAA titles. Among our most known games that we have developed and published, are the award-winning exploration adventure, The Solus Project, and the upcoming bullet-hell FPS, Mothergunship.

Apart from publishing our own in-house games, we are providing a variety [of] other services such as porting, AI, QA, online multiplayer, code reviews, assets creations, and much more. We are partners with some of the best-known developers and publishers in the industry, such as Versus Evil, Koch Media and Humble Bundle. Some of the most popular games we have worked on are Subnautica, Darkest Dungeon and Mighty No9.

As for Mothergunship, the game is co-developed by Grip Digital and Joe Mirabello (a.k.a. Terrible Posture Games - the man behind the successful FPS, Tower of Guns). The biggest part of the development is done by the Grip Digital team, together with the Joe's guidance who is directing the project.

MEDIA: MOTHERGUNSHIP Gameplay Footage

2. What makes a 2018 FPS fun?

This is a tough question, and I'm learning more about the answer to it every day. The only thing I know for certain is that a FPS in 2018 has to offer something a little more than simply being a shooter from the first-person perspective. Sure, the weapon is still the player's avatar in the game world, and interacting with it still needs to feel immediately and inherently engaging… however, nowadays players look for something beyond the raw gun mechanics. I think there can be many things a game can offer to satisfy gamers today; whether it's a compelling world, a highly engaging simulation-drive environment, or, like Mothergunship, a robust modular crafting system.

3. Why did you want to create a modular gun-crafting system for your game?

The crafting system grew out of lessons learned from a previous game we worked on, Tower of Guns. In that game players could add certain modifiers to their guns and create really wild and hilarious combinations. It was entertaining, although it was also strictly architected by hand, meaning all the combinations were hand crafted and balanced. One of the most requested features was to extend that system into something more systemic: something that allowed the players to really explore such combinations in a more sandbox framework. Such a system was never destined for Tower of Guns, but was on my mind from the beginning with Mothergunship. However, it took a lot of iteration and collaboration, as well as some particularly skilled developers at Grip Digital, before we finally began to narrow in on the purely modular system in Mothergunship. We find it to be really fun to play with and we hope other people will too.

Thanks for answering our questions, Grip Digital!

For more info on MOTHERGUNSHIP, check out the official website.

Straight from the Devs
April 06, 2018
Published in Dev Talks

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