ESPORTS4INDIE

A tightly designed, fast-paced, top-down roguelite, Synthetik will no doubt entertain for hours. With the release of the new Legion Rising free update, there’s even more to enjoy.

From the developers of PayDay 2 comes the zombie-smashing, bandit-blasting, loot-scavenging, 4-player co-op title, OVERKILL’s The Walking Dead (OTWD). While this title is set to release on November 6th, the beta weekends have begun and testing is well underway for the pre-order masses. Bugs are plentiful and “clunkiness” is fairly rampant, but that’s what betas are for, right?

Yakuza 0 offers a riveting tale of organized crime and an action-packed, open world filled with interesting characters to PC players who missed out on the Playstation release two years ago.

Immortal: Unchained pushes you into a hardcore RPG universe full of magazine-fed weapons and ancient battle axes, but doesn’t quite hit the target with its rough edges and choppy AI.

Two parts XCOM and one part Invisible, Inc., Phantom Doctrine is a fun take on the turn-based tactical genre that struggles with silly pathfinding and an uncertain storyline.

Strange Brigade is Rebellion’s much anticipated multiplayer-adventure – and what an adventure it is! Built for 1-4 player co-op, this title doesn’t do thing by halves. Mysterious dungeons, strange cats and huge, tough enemies are the norm here.

You could try to give The Dark Inside Me the benefit of the doubt and say it’s attempting to be dark and edgy, but any way you look at it, it falls on the wrong side of offensive and trashy, without any kind of decent gameplay to fall back on. 

The graphics are great, but the story and the characters could use more development. The choices you make don’t feel like they matter to the outcome of this brief experience.

Haimrik is an out-there mixture of puzzler and platformer that succeeds in heart, yet falls short of being intelligent — much like the main character.

In celebration of Dead by Daylight’s two-year anniversary and the feat of surpassing over 4 million copies sold across all platforms, Behaviour Interactive released the newest DLC — Curtain Call.

Ancestors Legacy has something to offer everyone. Between its multiplayer skirmishes and its impressive solo campaigns, there’s enough to entertain any kind of player.

Dead Ground:Arena is another attempt at wave shooting for VR that doesn't do enough to stand out from the crowd. Its arcade-y gameplay can be fun for a little while, but its clunky movement system and poor design choices hold it back from being anything special.

Independent developer Fatshark today announced that the Warhammer: Vermintide 2 Pre-Order BETA is available. Everyone who has bought Warhammer: Vermintide 2, the sequel to Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide, will have access to the BETA all the way to the release on March 8.

The Red Strings Club transports you into a gritty, 1980’s-inspired cyberpunk future to solve a mystery that asks more questions about morality and human nature than it answers. The nostalgic feel isn’t overpowering or gimmicky; rather, the setting could pass as something straight out of the Blade Runner universe, yet maintains its own style and originality. Modern technology is referenced, but the backbone of the plot takes your curiosity for a ride with its fantastical sci-fi elements. Add just a dash of that decades-old pixel art aesthetic, and you have a solid entry into the cyberpunk genre.

While it is respectable that  Syndrome VR attempts to pay homage to some of the best titles in the sci-fi survival horror genre, it neither distinguishes itself with new ideas nor does it improve or even match the elements it lifts from these titles. Its campaign is filled with backtracking and padding, and when anything of significance happens, this, too, is let down by poor stealth and shooter gameplay. Furthermore, the tacked-on VR mode is not up to the industry standard and doesn't justify the higher price. The most hardcore fans of the genre may be able to overlook many of its flaws, but as it stands, there are much better options out there.

Lust For Darkness, a first-person psychological thriller, combines a duo that few would have ever thought to merge, and even fewer would ever want to see: Cthulu-like horrors and limitless sexual bacchanalia. Developers at Lunar Cult Studios staged an immensely successful Kickstarter, amassing over 500% of their original goal for their game centered around “erotic and occult themes.” Taking clear inspirations from Amnesia: The Dark Descent and amateur pornography, the pre-release demo for Lust For Darkness is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, a video game.

A Robot Named Fight truly makes a name for itself with everything it does. While not an overly plot-driven title, the story behind it all is a fascinating and fun take on a classic, which is then delivered in such a beautifully retro vessel that it is hard to believe you are playing it on a PC in your own room and not a coin-operated console at your local penny arcade. A Robot Named Fight is fast fun, a perfect way to spend five minutes or an hour and a half, and a perfect staple for anyone’s gaming library.

Suicide Guy caters to the underserved demographic of people who enjoy 3D puzzle platformers, except this serving is more of a home-cooked meal from Grandma’s house after she had gotten dementia. It’s made with love, and is good at certain parts, but in the end, it leaves a bad taste in your mouth. Graphics and level design can be clever at times, but are essentially ruined by the frustrating physics and collision, lack of any good music, repetitive sound effects, half-finished animations, and stale platforming. I want to love Suicide Guy, and I do, in a way -- I appreciate the effort that was made, but when I was done I felt unsatisfied and dead inside.

Neofeud's futuristic, Bladerunner-like world, its thoughtful dialogue that's entirely voice acted, and its fresh point-and-click puzzles make it a title worth trying — as long as you're aware that it has some annoying flaws along the way. After a slow start, Neofeud develops into a complex tale that approaches profound ideas about what it means to be sentient, what it means to care about someone who may or may not be alive, and how it could be a big problem our society could face someday soon.

The same elements and design choices in Observer that make it a cerebral and provocative failed-future experience are those that prohibit satisfaction in its gameplay. Detailed world-building shines through in-game dialogue and lore, yet falls drastically short in any actual spatial embodiment of forces and institutions. The small space in which you're trapped is a quaint microcosm of Observer's world, but after rich promises of variety and exploration, it's ultimately too micro to satisfy.

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