Equal parts charming and cheeky, Minit plays on a 60-second time mechanic that keeps you hotly anticipating every moment. Nostalgic black-and-white art and straightforward puzzles contribute to Minit’s unique simplicity — a simplicity which, ultimately, is both its strength and its final drawback.

Double Kick Heroes looks like a satanic crossover of Oregon Trail, Guitar Hero, and Left 4 Dead, and it plays like a champ. Fighting zombies while music inspired by legendary metal artists plays in the background is something that doesn’t get old.

Mercenary Kings: Reloaded is just as much fun as it was when it released back in 2014. The additions, while not completely game-changing, inject a nice sense of variety into the original. New weapons, characters, and the ability to buy materials encourages players to experiment. Unfortunately, this side-scroller still suffers from repetitiveness when playing for long periods of time, thanks to a lack of mission variety. This is alleviated by the options allowed, making this title a joy to play the whole time.

The Red Strings Club transports you into a gritty, 1980’s-inspired cyberpunk future to solve a mystery that asks more questions about morality and human nature than it answers. The nostalgic feel isn’t overpowering or gimmicky; rather, the setting could pass as something straight out of the Blade Runner universe, yet maintains its own style and originality. Modern technology is referenced, but the backbone of the plot takes your curiosity for a ride with its fantastical sci-fi elements. Add just a dash of that decades-old pixel art aesthetic, and you have a solid entry into the cyberpunk genre.

Dusk is a nifty little shooter from the dawn of the FPS era, and while it feels like a long-lost DOS game that time forgot, it brings a fresh twist to the FPS table while reminding us why we fell in love with shooters in the first place. Guns are cool, levels are fun, enemies put up a good fight — and with the game being in Early Access, there’s more yet to come from this gem. It's a promising title with a bright future.

Odysseus Kosmos and his Robot Quest is a charming title and a solid first entry into an episodic series. The old school pixel graphics and humorous banter give the game a human touch, while it gets hurts by dialogue that feels long winded at times. As a narrative-driven point-and-click the story is paramount, and while the puzzles are interesting there isn’t much character development or narrative so far. Just enough to keep you hanging on for further episodes.

Independent developer Fourattic and Devolver Digital have announced their vibrant adventure Crossing Souls will arrive on PlayStation 4 and PC Feb. 13, 2018. The new ‘Ready for Adventure’ gameplay trailer celebrates this announcement with a fresh look at gameplay and a nostalgic trip through the game’s influences including Stand By Me, E.T., and Ghostbusters.

Isn't it great? Party Hard Tycoon, developed by Pinokle Games, allows you to create, decorate, plan, run, over-hype, and manage your own themed parties. The themes range across the board — really — from a Vodka party to a Zoo Party. They even have themes for gamers, too, complete with arcade cabinets to fill your venue.

Polish publisher Fat Dog Games has announced that "The Chronicles of Nyanya", a new cat-filled RPG game will be available on Steam, November 18th. Players tried out "The Chronicles of Nyanya" during Pixel Heaven in Poland, Gamescom in Germany, ChinaJoy in Shanghai and PAX Seattle.

A Robot Named Fight truly makes a name for itself with everything it does. While not an overly plot-driven title, the story behind it all is a fascinating and fun take on a classic, which is then delivered in such a beautifully retro vessel that it is hard to believe you are playing it on a PC in your own room and not a coin-operated console at your local penny arcade. A Robot Named Fight is fast fun, a perfect way to spend five minutes or an hour and a half, and a perfect staple for anyone’s gaming library.

Seemingly an anomaly on the Steam store, Baobabs Mausoleum Ep. 1 Ovnifagos Don’t Eat Flamingos is a weird but worthwhile play.  It presents a unique and twisted world and a story with a considerable extent of both human imagination and sanity.  Each puzzle and problem is different and engaging, providing an innovative experience.  As the first installment in the series, we have hopeful anticipation for a successor, to see how the developers will continue to polish what they have here.

On the Island of Ditto, players will get to experience a “micro RPG” of sorts, with players exploring a delightful but dangerous overworld and braving menacing dungeons to overcome the evil that plagues of the island.

Cladun Returns This is Sengoku achieves what it sets out to be with an apparent abundance of effort on the part of the developers. However, Cladun is not for everyone, and probably not even for most people. It’s intensely focused on customization, attention to detail, and a formidable obsession with stats. In the process, it sacrifices story and the option for casual gameplay; those not familiar with heavy RPG play, might want to think twice before plunging into Cladun.

Gambitious Digital Entertainment has announced it will publish independent developer Italo Games’ Milanoir, a pixel-packed action game inspired by the masterpiece Italian crime movies of the 1970s. The title is expected to launch later this year on Windows PC.

Domina frustrated me beyond belief, but in the best way. I thought I had planned a match out to perfection, got slaughtered, but loved every minute of it. I only wish there was more to the game, as restarting again at square one became a little tedious after a while. Despite that, I will still revisit it time and again for a quick fix of blood and profanity.

1166 offers the equivalent of a B-movie horror in video game form, complete with all the quirks and mistakes that come with small budget productions. If you want a new take on side-scrolling storytelling that mixes Lovecraftian style occult horrors with surreal walks through pixel fields, you’ll feel right at home in 1166.

Yet another rogue-lite glorifying the genocide of the pirate race, Flinthook’s clever controls and mechanics bring challenging gameplay that requires practice to make perfect. Procedurally-generated levels and progression through death ensure a unique experience, reinforced by pleasing visuals and an equally accomplished soundtrack. All will find themselves motivated to keep playing, and lovers of the genre will surely appreciate the twists that successfully make Flinthook a unique experience in a saturated market.

Lil Tanks is a solid title, providing four distinct game modes, twenty unique types of enemies, four tank variants, and multiple power-ups and weapon upgrades. The gameplay is uncomplicated and offers an enjoyable experience. However, it lacks any form of customization, and it might become repetitive after a few hours. Lil Tanks succeeds as a side-scrolling shooter, but there is a scarcity of originality in the game. That said, genre enthusiasts should certainly be entertained, especially at its current price point.

The neon-clad, Japanese-themed platformer Slime-san is a cute 2D puzzler with simplistic yet endearing design. Requiring all of the skills and reflexes of Super Meat Boy, Slime-san is not a challenge to take lightly. While the intricate levels and fast-paced gameplay have an initial appeal for speedrunners, Slime-san lacks enough substance to keep the player’s attention for long.

In all, Beat Cop is a sharp, retro-centric look at 80s Brooklyn, with all its exciting cocaine, prostitution, gang wars, and overly synthesized tunes, but Beat Cop doesn't rely on nostalgia to succeed. It's a title that stands on its own, and casual racism and sexisms aside, it handily competes with similar time-management titles that have been released in the last few years.

Thimbleweed Park is a shining example of the ideal in the point-and-click genre, featuring the puzzles, storylines, dialog, and other goodies that bring players back, time and time again. It is a must-play, purchase-immediately release. The stellar comedy, gripping mystery, and polished design set a new standard in the genre, and prove that even classic themes, like those of it's spiritual fore-figure, Maniac Mansion, can be revisited, revised, and perfected for a new generation of gamers.

River City Ransom: Underground is fantastic in how it truly captures the feel of retro games, and it’s clear from the experience that Conatus Creative provides the desire and requisite talent. On top of the original beat-em-up feel, additional features round out the title quite nicely, such as RPG leveling aspects and a fighting engine that packs a punch.

Without a doubt, few things are more appealing than a good excuse to log online and murder random opponents with my friends – and, typically, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) variety is preferable to salty, overly-competitive strangers. Streets of Rogue is a refreshing, action-RPG-adventure-stealth-shooter conglomeration developed by Matt Dabrowski, and it's a title that promises to be an excellent addition to the line-up of hits from tinyBuild Games. Released on March 10th, 2017, this Early Access title stresses that it is all about choices – but will gamers choose it, when there are so many other chaotic, anarchic alternatives?

With bursts of pressure, ethereal atmosphere, and engaging soundtrack, Blink brings style and originality to your standard design in puzzle-platforming. If you’re a fan of the genre and are equipped with a controller, its cheaper price point makes it worth a buy.

Kronos uses uninspired or recycled art style, storyline, and dialogue, but that's just that start of what's wrong with this title. Beyond the aesthetic issues, the bugs in Kronos are too much to ignore. Maybe with more work on bugs and glitches, Kronos could be playable enough to enjoy; for now, Kronos doesn’t come close to standing out in an already competitive genre.

With a few tweaks to make it a little more palatable to the modern gamer, Alwa’s Awakening captures the joy that can come from conquering a difficult experience. It doesn’t do anything new, but in bringing back the old, it shows how fun finding your own way can be.

With an intricately crafted world, innovative and engaging battle system, and delightful array of scenery and music, this game is a splendid and true tribute to the SNES JRPG.  The bugs one might encounter in beta versions are overshadowed by pure awe and captivation—a relentless desire to play more and more.

XenonValkyrie is a project that held many promising ideals.  It sought to be the synchronized combination of a platforming shooter, rogue-like, and Metroidvania game, but couldn't quite live up to its potential.  It had too much on its plate, and the result was a disjointed and buggy mash of disconnected aspects of many genres.  Pile that on top of balance, design, and control issues and you get a game that is unfairly difficult and lacks truly elaborate content.  Nevertheless, the game is still somewhat enjoyable, if you have a knack for the brutally challenging and are willing to invest a lot of time and tolerance to unravel what it does have to offer.

Use your magic staff and progress through a large interconnected world where you'll solve puzzles, fight enemies and defeat bosses in order to help free the land of Alwa. Explore and uncover the secrets by using your platforming skills in this challenging and charming 8-bit adventure game.

As much as I wanted to recommend Don't Chat With Strangers, your time and money are better spent elsewhere. Accumulating Steam Achievements which are, essentially, a scrapbook of the many ways in which Lucy killed you, is undeniably fun. Sadly, these aren't enough to make the title shine: Don't Chat With Strangers is another retro, point-and-click adventure with much novelty and a great premise to begin with, yet it ultimately fails as a puzzle horror game.

Milkmaid of the Milky Way makes its impression as a passion project that had solid foundations but leaves a little more to desire. It hits all the right notes in every way, but leaves room for expansion. Much has untapped potential that, I suspect, isn't matched with the developer’s funds and assets. Even though the game is short, you feel engaged and immersed the entire way. It’s also a title that could appeal to anyone, even gamers who aren't accustomed to classic point-and-click games. Overall, the inexpensive Milkmaid of the Milky Way is worth checking out. Appreciate the heart and personalization that went into making it so concisely wonderful.

Super Rad Raygun has many things and is a great reminder of the old days, for those old enough to have had a Nintendo Gameboy during the 90’s. Slick retro style. Easy mechanics. Great references, if you're capable of picking them up, and a nice soundtrack. Expect mix ups with downloads, which would probably be fixed in a future update. Yet even with the nostalgia, it's hard to decide if I like it - or not.

Creepy Castle feels like it’s complete and was handled with love.  It hit all the right notes with me:  quirky but meaningful plot and characters, elegant retro art and sound, and simple but engaging exploration and combat. 

BUTCHER is a polished, extremely well-built 2D shooter that wears its difficulty on its sleeve. It's an absolute blast to play, but players may find difficulty adjusting to the incredible challenges that await them. If you have the patience to withstand this level of gameplay, you’ll be prepared to feel the rush of adrenaline when completing one of BUTCHER’s insanely hard levels. It isn't Dark Soulism, or Hotline Miamian excellence, but it comes darn close. The game looks great and plays great, and I most def recommend it to anyone looking for some brutal, arcade action.

Madrobot X fails to mix up the genre in any meaningful way, but it doesn’t have to. It’s a cheap game that plays well and is worth checking out for anyone who is a fan of old arcade shoot ‘em ups. If you’ve got a buck and a few minutes to kill, you might as well go for it.

The gameplay isn’t deep, the content isn’t even slightly politically-correct, and there aren’t enough levels. That said, Intensive Exposure is a stupidly-fun game that delivers exactly what it promises, with a few great surprise laughs along the way. Definitely worth it.

I absolutely cannot recommend the Lucius Demake highly enough, for anyone who enjoys macabre storylines, a riveting, intriguing Point-&-Click adventure, or even just for fans of the original two Lucius titles.

I had no little expectations when I first started playing Dreambreak. The screenshots looked interesting and I’m a sucker for point and click based titles, especially ones that seem to have new takes on the genre, so I just had to try it out. What I got was a pleasant little surprise of a gem.

Rescue exotic space animals from a corrupt AI in Dr. Spacezoo, a chaotic twin-stick precision shoot-em-up for 1-4 players. Or reduce them to gibs. Your call, monster.

In a gaming word where top-down shooters are quite overplayed and almost flooding the market, Enter The Gungeon has done an excellent job setting itself aside from the rest. Not many top-down shooters have such well-done mechanics and fun dungeon crawling aspects. Currently available now on Steam, priced at $14.99, this game is definitely worth picking up and giving it a run through. I think you’ll enjoy it just as much as I have.

Bunker Punks is a roguelike first-person shooter set in a dystopian future. You control a group of revolutionaries, raiding corporate strongholds for supplies, weapons and armor. Customize your bunker, strengthen your gang and overthrow the corporate government.

Although no raw innovation is involved, Bunker Punks delivers a solid shooter experience. It's a test of PvE skill in a simple space. There is a risk and return for every playing method, which capitalizes on replay value. Being greedy and rash will lead to repetition, but going slow and steady will be frustrating. It's up to you to strike a balance.

tinyBuild is an American video game publisher and video game developer that is primarily associated with the games No Time to Explain and SpeedRunners. Based in Bothell, Washington, with a development studio in Utrecht, Netherlands, the company was founded by Alex Nichiporchik, Luke Burtis and Tom Brien.