Dec 17, 2017 Last Updated 11:30 PM, Dec 15, 2017

Tokyo Dark to Launch September 7

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Cherrymochi Tells an Anime Tale Of Secrecy And Sanity

Square Enix Collective™ announces that Tokyo Dar, the anime inspired side-scrolling point-and-click adventure from Tokyo-based Cherrymochi, will launch on September 7, 2017.

Having raised more than CAD$225,000 on Kickstarter - smashing the studio’s goal of CAD$40,000 with ease - Tokyo Dark is a shadowy, twisting, psychological adventure comprised of multiple branches and endings. Cherrymochi has tapped into the urban legends that surround the Japanese capital to add real substance to its tale of mystery.

Players take on the role of Detective Ayami Itō as she explores the streets of Tokyo in an attempt to find her missing partner; following leads, collecting clues and - most importantly - taking decisions that change her relationship with the city and its inhabitants.

Itō’s story is an intentionally conflicting one,” offers Maho Williams, Producer at Cherrymochi. “In Tokyo Dark, we want the player to be constantly questioning whether they’re one step away from solving the puzzle, or one step away from madness. Are they slowly unearthing the city’s dark living shadows, hidden from view, or are they imagining it all?”

Tokyo Dark’s anime style presents an immersive 2D world where the player is focused on peeling back the city’s layers to reveal the truth hidden underneath.

Taking inspiration from everything from Shenmue and Heavy Rain through to Clocktower and The Blackwell Legacy, dialogue choices throughout steer the story in different directions, changing Itō’s interactions with key characters and altering the game’s conclusion. Puzzles can also be solved in multiple different ways, ensuring players can find their own path as they play.

Tokyo Dark goes beyond what most animated adventures attempt, with Itō’s very sanity called into question as she delves deeper into the city’s story,” says Phil Elliott, Director of Community & Indie Development at Square Enix London. “I think there’s a real appetite for new ideas in horror games, and Cherrymochi is certainly telling a dark tale, but in a fresh and absorbing way. We’re really proud that the team chose us as a publishing partner, and we know already that there’s a keen anticipation from gamers across the world to uncover the game’s layered mysteries...”

Website: tokyodark.com
Twitter: twitter.com/CherryMochii
Facebook: facebook.com/TKYdark/

About Square Enix Collective

Square Enix Collective is an initiative that provides a range of non-restrictive services to independent developers to help them raise the profile of their projects, and bring them to market.

Services include community-building via the Collective Feedback platform; publishing and marketing services (including QA and platform relations); aA limited number of production investments for specific projects.

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