Jul 23, 2017 Last Updated 1:57 AM, Jul 23, 2017
Published in Adventure
Read 964 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)

You are the true heir of the Blue Tear, a blue amulet with great mystical power.

This amulet is the key to destroying the evil “Black Wizard” from killing your family and friends and possessing a body to return to human form and wreak more havoc. In order to save your family, the good “White Wizard” sends you to Africa to make a tribal mask, talk to the African tribal gods, heal a healer, and trek the African Safari... Let's admit it: the plot may slightly sound like neocolonialism is making its way into video games. It's also pretty random. Why did I have to travel to Africa to save my family back home? And if I’m the true heir to the Blue Tear, why did I have to go retrieve it?

During the first quarter of the game, you spend your time in Africa searching around for things that seemed to have absolutely no relevance to the plot. I, for one, was never sure how any of my required tasks were supposed to help defeat the “Black Wizard” or save my family. Half of the time, I was just talking to a weird tribal mask about voodoo rituals and healing the healer in the African village. I guess the healer wasn’t very good at his job…

The plot was also not scary at this point, which is what I had expected from Blue Tear’s marketing material. It seemed like MysteryTag, the developers of Blue Tear, needed to add more time to the game and just threw these scenes in without much connection to the rest of adventure.

Negatives aside, do not let this deter you from continuing to play the rest of Blue Tear. Once I successfully completed the irrelevant tasks through the African village, I was transported to the core of the game, where the story picks up and I could not stop playing.

Blue Tear truly starts when you are transported from Africa back to the creepy family home.

The “Black Wizard," which you find out is very similar to Chucky from Child’s Play, has transferred his soul into a baby doll and is using it to kill your family and friends and prevent you from reaching them or from interrupting his evil plans. As you progress through the house and come across dead bodies, it gets convincingly more creepy and intriguing. The story builds on itself, and you feel as though every step closer to the “Black Wizard” becomes more haunting and chilling. The graphics are also pretty decent and on par with a hidden objects game, and the sounds are extremely relevant to a horror story: creaking floorboards, shuffling leaves, and suspenseful music.

Blue Tear is not a typical hidden objects game.

It is more like a point-and-click adventure that incorporates different types of puzzles and hidden object challenges. I was surprised by how many areas there are to explore and that you had to backtrack to already explored areas in order to find clues you missed before. These areas are also always changing as you progress through Blue Tear, and you have to constantly go back to make sure you completed every challenge. Truthfully, there were not as many hidden object challenges as I had expected, but there were so many other types of puzzles that I didn’t even care. MysteryTag’s Blue Tear is the ultimate puzzle of puzzles. Other than hidden object challenges, there are jigsaw puzzles, coloring activities, decoding challenges, and even tasks like the popular oldies, Bejeweled and Tetris. Even the hidden object challenges in Blue Tear are not the typical hidden object challenges you find in other similar titles. Not only do you have to find objects on the provided list, but there are also some objects you can only find if you combine other objects first. For example, “Smoke” could be the object listed, but instead of simply finding smoke in the hidden objects scene, you have to find wood and fire and combine them to make smoke. I thought this was truly unique and a great game-changer for the hidden-objects genre.

7

The Verdict

I completed Blue Tear in 4.5 hours and for the original price of $8, I think it was well worth it. After getting through the nonsense of Blue Tear’s African travels, the story becomes creepy and engaging, and just like a great horror novel; you don’t want to turn it off. Continuing to play will not disappoint you. The story builds and builds as you progress, and increasingly becomes more intricate and scary. The puzzles integrated within the story are excellent and cover the whole spectrum of puzzles from hidden objects to codes to jigsaw puzzles. Blue Tear combines all the great puzzles classics and is a true delight for any puzzle seeker.

Jessica Andrews

Whether it's dancing on the streets of Paris or swimming with the dolphins in the Dominican Republic, you can find Jessica anywhere in the world at any given moment. While she is an avid traveler, she calls Washington, DC her home and spends most of her days working as an analytic writer for a tech firm. Growing up in a Japanese household, gaming was always a part of her life. Video games brought her family together and she has kept the tradition alive ever since. In her free time, she also enjoys photography, traveling, running, dancing, and Krav Maga.

Related items

  • The Surge Demo Now Available

    Play the game from the very beginning as you start your battle through CREO, a megacorporation hit by a devastating catastrophe. The demo features hours of unlocked content, and progression will carry over to the full game when you decide to continue the fight. You’ll pick up exactly where you left off.

  • No70: Eye of Basir Review

    No70: Eye of Basir is an ambitious title; while the visuals and audio are noteworthy, in the critical areas of story and gameplay, Basir is passable, not exceptional. The brief plot explores, then seems to abandon, what appeared to have been a key plot point, and, at times, it’s a bit unclear who your character even is. Issues with performance and geometry clipping, combined with some sloppy foliage and prop placement, occasionally break immersion: No70: Eye of Basir is a flawed gem with some good facets.

  • The Search Interview

    Embark on a journey of discovery and inspiration in The Search - a story-driven puzzle-adventure set in a mysterious world where art comes to life! In an unknown world, you'll search for clues about the nature of this place, as well as your own past. Guided only by the letters of a mysterious stranger, you'll find that this universe works differently from our own.

More in this category: Elena Review »

Latest Shows

Empathy: Path of…

Empathy: Path of Whispers is an atmospheric and story-driven adventure game where you explore a seemingly abandoned world through the emotions and memories of the people who once i...

The Search Inter…

Embark on a journey of discovery and inspiration in The Search - a story-driven puzzle-adventure set in a mysterious world where art comes to life! In an unknown world, you'll sear...

Out Soon

PC Gaming Incoming

Fortnite

Fortnite is described as a co-op sandbox survival game and is about exploration, scavenging items, c...

Neverwinter: Tom…

Neverwinter’s Harpers seek to end the wickedness of a new death curse on the jungle peninsula of Chu...

Pyre

A New World From the Creators of Bastion and Transistor, Pyre is a party-based RPG in which you lead...

The Inner World …

The flute nose dynasty has been watching over Asposia for centuries on end. In secret, they fill the...

Dead Purge: Outb…

Dead Purge: Outbreak is not fun or innovative, borrowing too heavily from many superior titles. Ultimately, the title is a zombie itself: slow-moving, mindless, collapsing readily ...

Late Shift Revie…

Late Shift is interactive storytelling at its finest, a Full-Motion Video (FMV) title where Choices Matter. This gripping "crime thriller" puts players in the hot seat, allowing th...

Baobabs Mausoleu…

Seemingly an anomaly on the Steam store, Baobabs Mausoleum Ep. 1 Ovnifagos Don’t Eat Flamingos is a weird but worthwhile play.  It presents a unique and twisted world and a story w...

inVokeR Early Ac…

inVokeR is, by far, the best spell-casting virtual reality experience that I’ve played, thanks in large part to its immersive controls and exciting combat. If more modes and featur...