Dec 17, 2017 Last Updated 11:30 PM, Dec 15, 2017
Tiffany Lillie

Tiffany Lillie

Tiffany is a gamer who appreciates having her mind stimulated. Her favorite games achieve this by telling great stories, presenting challenging puzzles, or by allowing her to be creative. She's a total sucker for games that allow her to customize things, although even she will admit there should be limits.

Steamburg needs more polishing to be player-friendly, being too buggy and clumsy in its current state. But even if these problems were addressed, Steamburg would merely be a predictable puzzle adventure with lacklustre visuals, a stereotypical storyline, and uninspired puzzles.

Educating the public about mental illness is important, but a problem inherent in accurately portraying depression is that, well, it isn't fun to be depressed. Indygo skillfully builds a gloomy atmosphere: The voice acting, music, black and white art style, and narrative all work together to convey the disconnection and emptiness a person suffering from depression can feel. You may come away with a better understanding of depression by playing, but if you're looking for entertainment along with your education, you will be disappointed.

Ayo shares with its audience a sincere message encapsulated by game, and continues the progression we have seen recently of video games used as a vehicle beyond the immediate capacity for ‘interactive entertainment.’ Despite a clunky camera and some problematic puzzles, this platformer boats a solid foundation, with promise of several hours of enlightening fun.

Müll’s puzzles detract from the experience of a graphic story focused on a narrative, for an experience tilting toward anxiety and depression. It’s unfortunate. A compelling plot, a character arc, and a clear message could go a long way, coupled with the drawings of the talented game creator, Ozzie Sneddon.

Last Day of June is unique and story-driven, suited for those who appreciate a slower-paced journey. The reward is an artful experience that stands a chance of resonating with your heart.

If you loved the first Cook, Serve, Delicious!, then you'll probably love Cook 2, as well. While there are major bugs for the Mac version right now, there are only minor bugs for Windows. I feel like using a mouse and keyboard will always feel somewhat constraining, however, although improvements to the gameplay could alleviate that feeling somewhat. As Cook 2 stands now, it is compelling, with plenty to enjoy in it, although ultimately the dish feels a bit stale.